What Every Driver Should Know About Tires

Underinflation of tires, according to studies by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is the leading cause of tire failure and, therefore, tire-related automotive accidents. In short, keeping your tires inflated to the proper pressure is integral for the safety or yourself, your passengers, and other drivers on the road. Check out the list we’ve compiled for you below from Esafetysupplies.com.

There are several reasons tires lose pressure. Tears in the tire wall or punctures are obvious causes of “slow leaks,” but ambient temperature can also cause changes in tire pressure as well. For example, if you live in Los Angeles where it is 68 degrees and drive up into the mountains where it is 33 degrees — a journey of about 1.5 hours – you can expect a 4.4 psi pressure drop by the time you reach your destination. Why? It’s typical for tires to lose pressure at approximately 1 psi for every 8-degree drop in temperature. On top of that, tires regularly lose 1 psi per month as well.

By: Felipe Skroski

Most of us simply “eyeball” our tires and don’t add air until we see a visual difference. This method is not reliable and if fewer people used it as a guide for proper inflation, there’d certainly be fewer accidents as well. In most cars, trucks, and SUVs, the recommended tire pressures are printed on a label in the glove box, on the driver’s manual, or on a sticker adhered to the doorframe. Keep a gauge handy and use it regularly. Doing so will not only keep you and your occupants safer, but will also improve your fuel economy.

It’s also important to have your tires rotated and inflated to the proper pressure about once every 6,000 miles unless the manufacturer of your vehicle suggests otherwise. … Read more